Miracleman Book One: A Dream of Flying Dec25

Miracleman Book One: A Dream of Flying

Miracleman Book One: A Dream of Flying Marvel Comics Alan Moore Have you heard of Miracleman? Even if you’re into comics chances are you haven’t. It’s a shame but it’s not your fault. Back in the golden age he was a hero called MarvelMan. He was the UK’s answer to DC’s Captain Marvel. It was your standard fun, 50’s “Wiz! Bang!” comics. Then came Alan Moore. The legendary Mr. Moore resurrected MarvelMan. Eventually, the name had to be changed to Miracleman. The series would become one of the most powerful, and important comics ever created. Thanks to legal problems, the series ended in the early 90’s while Neil Gaiman was at the helm. It was put into legal hell for decades, unable to be reprinted. In 2013 Marvel got the rights and began re-releasing both the original 50’s and the highly-anticipated Alan Moore run. I’ve been waiting to read this book for decades. My expectations had been built up. Everything I read and heard about the series rose my hopes and now I finally read it. And ya know what? It blew my expectations away. Yes. It is that good. It is every bit as good as people have said and then some. It’s an absolutely brilliant idea. Moore (due to legal reasons is known here as, *ahem,* “The Original Writer”) took the same character from the kooky 50’s book and revived him. After nearly twenty years of being simple Micky Moran Miracleman has returned. Twenty years of not knowing you’re the most powerful person on the planet. Twenty years of not remembering your past of fighting mad scientists and fantastically named villains. What happened twenty years ago? And what happened to his partners? Young Miracleman and Kid Miracleman. They’ve been gone for twenty years as well. I’ll be honest. I don’t want to spoil anything for anyone. That’s as much as you’re going to get. Just read this book. The writing is pure Alan Moore. Beautiful, dark, and smart. This take might be thirty years old and other creators might have taken ideas from it but Miracleman is still as relevant and innovative as ever. Garry Leach launched the book with Moore and his art is painstakingly gorgeous. His perfectionist style is stunning. It really is something to behold. It’s timeless. The work has been remastered only to highlight the impact his style has. Even after Alan Davis takes over, the quality never drops. Not that it would, Davis has been a top talent for as long as he’s been in the business. Miracleman is about the biggest must-read in comics there is, mainly because so few have read it and it’s that important. And that excellent. So, read it.   Jo...

Doctor Who: Prisoners of Time the Complete Series Nov26

Doctor Who: Prisoners of Time the Complete Series

Doctor Who: Prisoners of Time the Complete Series IDW Publishing Story: Scott Tipton, David Tipton Art by: Simon Fraser, Lee Sullivan, Mike Collins, Gary Erskine , Philip Bond , John Ridgway , Kev Hopgood , Roger Langridge , David Messina , Elena Casagrande , Matthew Dow Smith , Kelly Yates Some things in life will never happen. I’ll never get to see Queen, and I mean REAL Queen, live. The new Fantastic Four movie will never be good. And we will never get a Doctor Who episode where all the Doctors meet. And I don’t mean previously recorded footage and sound. I mean a real gathering of the hopes and dreams that fans have been waiting for all their lives. Don’t get me wrong, the 50th Anniversary came close. For anyone desiring that rush of having all the Doctors in one place, then thank the maker for comics. On the surface, it’s 12 (this series was released before Capaldi took the reigns) individual stories showcasing each Doctor and companions dealing with a problem in their own unique style. That is, until those companions start disappearing. At the same time. Yes, all companions, throughout time, disappear. How can the Doctor save his friends when he doesn’t even know they’re about to be taken? Who has the means to carry out something of this magnitude? It takes more than one Doctor and more than one friend to solve this problem. There is no problem with this series. Each issue featuring a different Doctor could be a huge failure. Thankfully, the writers, Scott and David Tipton, know their trivia. Every time we are shown a different version of the Doctor he has his own voice. They really found the correct persona for every Doctor. What’s more, none of the issues feel pointless. They may be standalone tales but each one gives you that classic power the show gives off. Like any great “Doctor Who” series there is an underlining story throughout, building tension with every bit that is given to us. The Tipton’s masterfully balance storytelling with character showcasing, especially amongst the companions. That’s the thing, while this is an epic story about the Doctor, (all of him) it’s really about his friends. And while there have been so many it’s difficult to give them all ample screen time, they are there. They’re there and they do it for him. It’s why the single issue showcases are so important. The Doctor solves the problem but it’s how he interacts with his companions that is the interesting part. It’s really the focus of the story even if it’s cleverly disguised beneath an amazing adventure. With a different era showcased in each issue, they all have different artists, and each one is a direct fit. Some names are bigger than others but each one took their assignment seriously and worked out a beautiful contribution to one of my favorite mini series of the year. Scott and David Tipton are a perfect writing team for “Doctor Who.” If their names are on a book it’s worth checking out. Even if I’ll never get to see a crossover of this magnitude on screen it doesn’t matter because “Prisoners of Time” has provided me with that thrill and more. Jo...

Vertigo Comics’ TRILLIUM Nov13

Vertigo Comics’ TRILLIUM

Trillium Vertigo Comics Script and art by Jeff Lemire Let’s start with the obvious. Jeff Lemire is a genius and we should all be in awe of his greatness. To achieve an ounce of his talent is to achieve become one with the Gods of Story. Long may they reign. He is amazing, his work is amazing, and everything he can do is amazing. OK, that’s out of the way. “Trillium.” To put it quickly, its amazing. How to accurately describe “Trillium?” It’s a beautiful sci-fi, time travel, reality bending epic that stretches what can be done with comics. Two journeys taking place at once. Time could be linear or time could be happening at the same time all at once. “Trillium” straddles the line of where it believes it should be and that’s part of the story. In the distant future the human population has plummeted to 4,000 people. A sentient virus has destroyed the universe and the only cure is a little flower called Trillium. Held behind walls, the aliens who own them are almost impossible to understand. Time is running out for the human race and Nika has to find a way to get those flowers before everyone else just stomps in and takes them. 1921, a man still suffering from the Great War travels back to the jungle to find, something. There’s something he has to find and there’s not telling what it could mean. Shortly, these two will cross paths. How can two people from different times and on different worlds end up together? That was rhetorical. Because, for you to learn the answer, you must read this book. Seriously. You have to. Lemire does things with the comic format in this book that really bring it to a new level. It’s quite a wonderful thing to behold. His ability to story-tell doesn’t just shine here, it burns brightly in proof he is one of the best storytellers in comics, ever. He proves it again and again with every book he does. His art is some of the most uniquely perfect art in comics. At first glance it could be mistaken for something less than what we are used to. But because he is the story teller of that caliber his art is just the delivery system for his excellence. With colorist Jose Villarrubia the story is lifted off the page. The words and the art are one with each other. Nothing here is out of place. It’s exactly where Lemire wants it to be and that is exactly where it’s suppose to be. “Trillium” is one of the best graphic novels of the year. It is added to the collection of Lemire books that are must reads on everyone’s book shelf. If we ever needed more evidence that we need more Jeff Lemire in our lives, “Trillium” is it. Jo...

WELCOME TO TRANQUILITY volume 1 Oct02

WELCOME TO TRANQUILITY volume 1

Best Comics You’ve Never Heard Of:  Welcome to Tranquility v.1 Writer: Gail Simone Art: Neil Googe If you haven’t noticed by now, the name Gail Simone is synonymous with high art and quality comics. Going back to one of her woefully underappreciated series we’re going to take a look at a little, lovely, and brilliant book known as “Welcome to Tranquility.” Unlike in comics, people get old. Super heroes get old. But where do those costumed characters go when they reach that age? When their minds start to go who will watch out for them? In the Wildstorm Universe they go to a serene town called Tranquility. It’s just a nice place that happens to be inhabited by people with powers. As well as the second and third generation, some with abilities, some just trying to get by working at fast foods restaurants, and some both. One of those fast food restaurants’ becomes the site of a clash of generations where one of the classics ends up dead. Mr. Articulate has been stabbed. In a community full of heroes and villains, egos and grudges that have lasted lifetimes, who isn’t a suspect? Sheriff “Tommy” Lindo has to figure that out. Everyone is connected somehow. What had Mr. Articulate done to deserve to be murdered? His demeanor put a lot of people off but there had to be something that pushed someone over the edge. Or maybe something in his illustrious past caused the push. Lindo has a lot to go through and none of it can be good. As previously stated Gail Simone is a comic’s god. Tranquility lasted 12 issues and the quality only rose with every issue. Her community was exactly what it should be. She created these real people with powers. People that had lost their fanfare but weren’t useless. It’s her ability to craft these people that pulls you in, to care about what’s happening. Their lives, as they are now, in this small town, are important. The mystery that is built is stands on the believability of the residents of Tranquility. And we all believe. Of course, Simone surrounds herself with talent like the amazing Neil Goose. His art stands out and delivers all the right moves. If nothing, it can be seen in the designs of the characters to their younger selves. It might be difficult to find this series but it’s more than worth your time. And once it’s over you’ll want more. And a TV series. To last forever and ever. That’s the power Simone has with words. Jo...

Crimespree on Comics: Archer and Armstrong v.1: The Michelangelo Code Sep18

Crimespree on Comics: Archer and Armstrong v.1: The Michelangelo Code...

Archer and Armstrong v.1: The Michelangelo Code Writer: Fred Van Lente Penciler: Clayton Henry Colorist: Matt Milla Letterer: Dave Lanphear Cover Artist: Arturo Lozzi, Patrick Zircher “Archer and Armstrong” has one of the best, most underrated writers in comics, a fan favorite artist, and some of the strongest reviews from the past two years. I’ve been dying to read the much ballyhooed revamp of the Valiant Comics classic and am quite glad I did. Obadiah Archer has been training his entire life for a mission from the Lord. His father, a Minister, and mother, a Congresswoman, have spent his 18 years of life readying him for destroying “He who shall not be named.” After saying goodbye to his many adopted brothers and sisters, who have also been in training, he sets out into the world of sin, starting with the most sinful place of all, New York City. A special artifact leads him directly to the person he needs to destroy, a big, burly, lush, who’s prone to poetry. And who is very, very old. Armstrong, as he’s called today, is used to people trying to kill him. But an 18 year old fighting prodigy claiming to be on a quest for God is close to new for him. Someone as old as he is and as big a partier as he always has been, he’s seen it all. And it’s that long past that he needs to unravel a large journey centuries in the making. Of course, he also has to stop this kid from trying to kill him. As well killer nuns, Hitler-aficionado monks, devil worshipers and the like. This is volume one and I need to get my hands on everything else. It’s one of the most entertaining and funny comics around. Cleary, this is the product that should be produced with you revamp a series. Fred Van Lente takes such care in the books he writes. Even though this isn’t his original property, he makes it his own. Every voice is unique and exciting. There isn’t a useless character shown. All will be needed and will be used with care. He has put a lot of work and research into A&A and we, the reader, benefit from it. Best of all, he makes it thoroughly engaging. I love everything about this book. Especially Clayton Henry’s art. A long-favorite of mine, he’s putting out the best work of his career here. His work is bright and animated. The two of them with the stunning color work of Mark Milla make “Archer and Armstrong” one of the best, A+, and obsessive books you need to add to your...