BEHIND THE BOOK – Fiction in the 1930’...

There are several different ways an author can approach writing a story set in another time period. They can do a lot of research on the time in order to get the historical details accurate. That’s an important part of the process because the same type of reader attracted to historical fiction will most likely know quite a bit about the era in which your story is set and won’t be shy about pointing out inaccuracies in their reviews.  But data on details and events can only get a writer so far. After all, you’re writing a novel, not a history book. It’s up to the writer to do more than just the details right. Tone is equally important, as is...

INTERVIEW WITH REX WEINER

The Misadventures of Rex Weiner It’s been a long, strange trip for Ford Fairlane. Rex Weiner’s rock n’ roll detective emerged from the late 70s underground music scene and was originally serialized in the New York Rocker and LA Weekly. The cultural relevance and up tempo hardboiled writing inevitably caught the eye of Hollywood, setting Weiner and his creation on a decade-long quest for the silver screen.  The result was “The Adventures of Ford Fairlane” starring Andrew Dice Clay, released by 20th Century Fox in 1990. A commercial flop at the time, the movie has since become a cult classic. So it’s totally understandable if that’s all you...

BEHIND THE BOOK :Writing That Second Novel

A Dialogue Between Annie Hogsett and Thomas Kies 1) What was the single biggest roadblock you discovered in writing your debut novel that affected the way you approached your second book? Tom: When I wrote RANDOM ROAD, I didn’t envision that it would be a series. My first book has a very neat ending. Everything is tied up at the end. Everyone, with one notable exception, lives happily ever after. In writing DARKNESS LANE, I had to quickly deconstruct all of that and recreate the flaws that made Geneva Chase interesting in the first place. Annie: I know this may sound like a flippant answer, but I’m serious: Looking for a publisher. As...

SHORT FICTION: SPINE (Inspired by an Actual One-ti...

“Mr. Hammett, Mr. Chandler, the lens is up here, please.” I swear, photographing a bunch of mystery writers is as tough as bridal parties, only without the kids sticking out tongues or scratching their business. I gave a three count so nobody would get caught blinking and pressed the shutter. They all gave me eyes except those two. Dashiell Hammett was staring three guys over at Raymond Chandler, who had his attention downward like he was wondering if he left the gas on. And what was with Hammett? Was he shooting daggers at Chandler or just feeling his scotch? Not that I’d been counting. I stopped at his third. I dated my exposed plate with...

Writing Our Way To Where We Belong

“Do you know what people really want? Everyone, I mean. Everybody in the world is thinking: I wish there was just one other person I could really talk to, who could really understand me, who’d be kind to me. That’s what people really want, if they’re telling the truth.” – Doris Lessing, The Golden Notebook When my brother-in-law was young, his dad went through a period of frustration over a household item that was routinely misplaced. They had an old hamper for their laundry to go in and it had a removable lid. Mr. Edwards would come home from work to find that the hamper’s lid had been left lying on the floor. This...