Māwake Crime Review

Bringing you superb crime writing from around the world Kia ora and haere mai; hello and welcome to the second edition of Māwake Crime Review, a new initiative here at Crimespree Magazine in 2018.  Each issue I’ll be featuring great crime writers and crime novels from beyond the borders of North America and Europe. For those who missed the first edition, Māwake is a word from the Māori language (the indigenous people of my home country, New Zealand) which translates to ‘south-east sea breeze’.  In this column we’ll be harnessing that breeze: highlighting terrific tales ‘blown in’ for crime-loving readers from the southern and eastern...

Author Workspaces – Gray Basnight, FLIGHT OF...

NYC Real Estate Situation: One bedroom on first floor in fashionable Chelsea Neighborhood.   Pros: Pet friendly, elevator building, convenient location in heart of Manhattan, close to transportation and restaurants, unusually large bath, renovated galley kitchen, exposed brick wall, modern appliances, combined living/dining, AC, gas heat, live-in superintendent. Cons: Little sunlight, no view, restricted street parking (big risk of parking tickets), nighttime street noise (especially Friday and Saturday nights), some vertical neighbor noise (especially…oh, never mind), next door construction noise, very near Google building (lots of...

INTERVIEW WITH Reavis Wortham Aug19

INTERVIEW WITH Reavis Wortham

MIKE BARSON: This is the seventh novel in the Red River Mystery series, and it opens in 1968, one of the most interesting years ever. Although you lived through that time as a teen, how did you research the specifics of the period to get it right for the novel? REAVIS WORTHAM: Part of that may be because a significant portion of the novel is based on the true story of a CIA experiment in California back in 1950. To conduct a simulation of a biological warfare attack, the U.S. Navy sprayed large quantities of a seemingly harmless bacteria over the city of San Francisco during a project called Operation Sea-Spray. A number ofcitizens...

BEHIND THE BOOK: David Corbett

Something More Than a MacGuffin Transforming Doc Holliday’s love letters into a Hitchcockian trope helped fulfill a lifelong ambition to bring those letters to life Long before I had any idea a concept like “antihero” existed, I found everything about Doc Holliday fascinating. Whether I encountered him in film, TV, or the books I devoured about the disappearing frontier, it was obvious he possessed a unique place in the national imagination. He not only epitomized the American West’s “Good bad man,” that iconic frontier Frankenstein constructed of part bitter war veteran, part desperado—a haunted loner clinging to the last scraps of his...

REVIEW OF ONLY TO SLEEP

ONLY TO SLEEP: A PHILIP MARLOWE NOVEL Lawrence Osborne 7/24/2018 Hogarth   “…there are some of us who can dream backward to the splendid years. There is an occasional glimpse of the old times here, and maybe it’s the last glimpse we’ll ever enjoy,” (2) reminisces the erstwhile private eye Philip Marlowe in Lawrence Osborne’s ONLY TO SLEEP. And look back we must—if only to acknowledge:  the Philip Marlowe of Raymond Chandler (1888-1959) and his renowned works THE BIG SLEEP (1939) and FAREWELL, MY LOVELY (1940) is no more. Look anew we also should: Marlowe is now in the capable hands of British author Lawrence Osborne and the “here” is...