2017 Anthony Award Nominees May17

2017 Anthony Award Nominees

About the Anthony Awards: The Anthony Award is named for the late Anthony Boucher (William Anthony Parker White), well-known writer and critic from the New York Times, who helped found the Mystery Writers of America.   ANTHONY AWARD NOMINATIONS Best Novel You Will Know Me – Megan Abbott [Little, Brown] Where It Hurts – Reed Farrel Coleman [G.P. Putnam’s Sons] Red Right Hand – Chris Holm [Mulholland] Wilde Lake – Laura Lippman [William Morrow] A Great Reckoning – Louise Penny [Minotaur]   Best First Novel Dodgers – Bill Beverly [Crown] IQ – Joe Ide [Mulholland] Decanting a Murder – Nadine Nettmann [Midnight Ink] Design for...

Review of STAR WARS: AFTERMATH: EMPIRE’S END

STAR WARS: AFTERMATH: EMPIRE’S END Chuck Wendig Del Rey Released 2/21/17 I have made no bones about being a huge Star Wars nerd. From a young age, I have devoured anything and everything that I could find in the Star Wars universe, and this was back when there were just three movies. I read all the books and particularly loved the Timothy Zahn trilogy, which I still revisit from time to time today. When Disney bought the rights to Star Wars, all these books that I had loved became “legends,” essentially, that they were good stories, but no longer part of the true Star Wars timeline, so that they could go in their own direction. While I...

A NEGRO AND AN OFAY by Danny Gardner

Down and Out Books May 15, 2017 It’s shortly after World War II in Danny Gardner’s debut novel, A NEGRO AND AN OFAY, and disgraced Chicago police officer Elliot Caprice has been on the run for the past year. He returns home to rural Illinois to find that his uncle has lost the family farm. Caprice starts working as a process server for a local attorney in an effort to earn enough money to buy the farm back from the bank. When he’s sent to serve papers to a wealthy North Side Chicago widow, Caprice finds himself in the middle of a mysterious family drama while trying to put his own family back together. Caprice is biracial, half black and...

Review of Robert B. Parker’s LITTLE WHITE LI...

ROBERT B. PARKER’S LITTLE WHITE LIES Ace Atkins Spenser Book 45 May 2, 2017 G. P. Putnam’s Sons ROBERT B. PARKER’S LITTLE WHITE LIE by Ace Atkins is another winner. Having taken over writing the Spenser novels nothing has been lost with this smart aleck character. Using his past experience as a journalist Atkins created an engaging story. Spenser’s long time girlfriend psychologist Susan Silverman has referred one of her clients, Connie Kelly, to him. Thinking she found the perfect man on an on-line dating site Connie eagerly wrote him a check for hundreds of thousands of dollars for a real estate investment. The problem is he vanished with...

You’ve Come a Long Way Baby; Feminist Crime Fiction May06

You’ve Come a Long Way Baby; Feminist Crime Fictio...

Remember the gumshoe lured into a trap by a beguiling femme fatale? If he was lucky, he survived and went on to marry the good girl. This was the staple of classic crime fiction and Hollywood film noir. There were two kinds of girls: the ones guys can’t resist, and those they marry, either sexy bad girls and “cute kid” good girls. Our male protagonist was a loner—usually a drinker—who prowled the mean streets, subject to his own unwritten code, but outside the law. Like Raymond Chandler’s Philip Marlowe or Dashiell Hammett’s Sam Spade, they navigated between the cops and the mob to stay alive and catch their man… or woman. With women...

Review of NOTHING SHORT OF DYING

NOTHING SHORT OF DYING Erik Storey 2016 Simon and Schuster When it comes to crime fiction, escaping the clichés necessary to write a novel with mass appeal while also offering a unique, fresh reading experience is almost impossible to achieve. Erik Storey’s NOTHING SHORT OF DYING, however, pulls it off, and the author does so in a way that is even more impressive: with his debut. Rough men, violence, guns, shady pasts, a new love interest, and drugs are all classic elements that can be found in this narrative, but Storey uses them wisely inside a mold that is entirely his. The result is a novel that belongs next to those of Jeffrey Deaver...