A LOOK INTO “NIGHT OF THE FLOOD” Mar05

A LOOK INTO “NIGHT OF THE FLOOD”

A NIGHT OF THE FLOOD co-edited by Sarah M. Chen and E.A. Aymar March 2017 Down and Out Books     An hour ago, I opened a box of ten copies of THE NIGHT OF THE FLOOD. I held the print version in my hand. I can’t stop staring at it. I just love the cover. The stark darkness, mixed with the sense of cinema noir, the bold red letters at the top like some sort of dire billboard on the outskirts of the novel’s fictional town of Everton…it’s pretty. Down and Out Books did a great job with this one. And, weirdly, I feel a different sense of pride than I normally do with something I’ve published. Maybe that’s because I’ve never co-edited an...

Fight Choreography – How I Develop Fight Scenes that Pass Muster with Actual Martial Artists Jan17

Fight Choreography – How I Develop Fight Sce...

Write what you know. Maybe that works for crime fiction writers who are former cops or prosecutors. I was a professional statistician. People won’t chat with you at a party longer than two minutes when that crap comes up so they’re not going to stick around for a whole book of it. I solved that problem pretty handily by making my protagonist a newbie. She’s a former uniform cop who quit and is now apprenticing as a private investigator with her father – a father who is out of the country for the entire book. She knew how to pull people over and write them tickets or respond to domestic violence calls but tracking down a murderer from...

Sue Grafton Remembered Dec29

Sue Grafton Remembered

The Alphabet Stops at Y. Y is for Yesterday. Thank you, lovely lady for all of the yesterdays you influenced and all of the tomorrows you will inspire. Sue Grafton has died. I’m not sure I can even process this news. I am definitely typing through tears. The lady has a singular place in this Mystery Fan’s heart. I am not alone. Millions of her books have sold to very loyal readers for 35 years now. It’s hard to believe A is for Alibi was first published in 1982. Harder still to know I almost missed it. But I didn’t. And I’m grateful. The following is not meant to be an “obituary” but the touchstones of my life, fandom and mystery community...

Music To Live By – Rich Zahradnik Oct22

Music To Live By – Rich Zahradnik

• “Born to Run” by Bruce Springsteen. I was in high school from 1974 to 1978. The music was awful—disco and hair bands (Foreigner, Styx, Kansas). I discovered Springsteen and he saved me from all that. He mixed the DNA of an old-school rock and roll band with a new, powerful sound. And such great stories. As a writer, I’m drawn as much or more to the lyrics as I am to the music. It was only after setting the Coleridge Taylor series in the seventies that I realized I could have Taylor discover Springsteen and gravitate to him for somewhat similar reasons, though Taylor is older than I was at the time. At the same time, he got to discover...

Memories Tried & Maybe Not So True Oct19

Memories Tried & Maybe Not So True

How reliable is memory? According to neuroscientists, not very. While we may view any particular memory as a continuous film of a past scene, those who study how the brain processes describe it as something more like a collage. As a 2012 Psychology Today article summarized, every time we conjure a memory, we are not so much reviewing a complete set of stored data as re-configuring a complex scene from disparate parts. In other words, every memory is newly re-assembled, and even if the pieces are accurate they may be prone to reinterpretation. Our current situation may sublimate the pain of a heartbreak – or accentuate the regret over a path...

Crime Authors On Their Favorite TV Shows

I have never written a crime story that wasn’t influenced, in some small part, by The Shield. From the whip crack of the pilot right through the brutal finale, Shawn Ryan’s gang of LA cops was a veritable showcase of men and women who alternated seamlessly between charming and corrupt, who were complex and messy without ever fully sacrificing the audience’s sympathy and understanding of what made each of them tick. Ryan turned Michael Chiklis’ roly-poly Commish into the jacked and nasty Vic Mackey and gave us Walton Goggins, then a bit player with a hy-yuck accent, now a bona fide star with an Emmy nomination and an...