Reading Rebirth

For a few years, when I talk comics with my friends (Dan Malmon and my sister Jennifer in particular) when we discuss DC comics the observation we seem to agree on more than anything else is that what has been missing is this: fun, light and the hope. From all indications, Rebirth will be addressing this. Now, I have been reading comics since the late sixties and buying them with my own money since the early seventies. I’ve gone through any number of crisis events and reboots. Through it all, I usually end up enjoying the comics DC has put out. Sure, there were some that left me dropping books from my pull list, but overall I kept reading....

HAWKEYE #1 with Kate (and Dan) Jan03

HAWKEYE #1 with Kate (and Dan)

Kate: I’m bored. ::throws dart across room. Hits Hummel between eyes:: Dan: I’m cold. I hate the winter. K: We’ve watched every episode of Veronica Mars. And face it dude: your verbal skills don’t measure up to Kristen Bell. D: Huh? Wha? Oh. K: I rest my case. D: ::shrugs:: K: I need adventure! And snappy repartee! And hot California abs! D: ::flexes in mirror, single tear falls:: I don’t have hot California abs, or even cool Minnesota abs, even. But I do have the new HAWKEYE #1 by Kelly Thompson and Leonardo Romero. Kate Bishop takes up the bow and arrow in her first solo series. And believe me, her debut issue has all the adventure and...

Review of Archie, Volume 2 Jan01

Review of Archie, Volume 2

Archie, Volume 2 Mark Waid, writer Veronica Fish and Thomas Pitilli, artist It’s been a little while since the first trade of the revamped Archie came out, and now there’s a whole new part of the story in Archie Volume 2. This one, like its predecessor, is packed full of drama but manages to keep it light. Though, if you want all the drama possible, read Betty & Veronica; issue 1 is conveniently tucked in the back of the trade. Archie and Veronica are still trying to sneak around Mr.  Lodge, who hates Archie. Reggie Mantle is dishing dirt on Archie to him, but eventually gets out of the way. Mr.Lodge still wants Archie gone, but to no...

Hard Case Crime Comics Nov20

Hard Case Crime Comics

  Hard Case Crime has been consistently publishing great books for a long time now. This fall the opened a new door and have started publishing comics. It is safe to say if you are a fan of their books you will love these comics. And what a perfect fit. Crime fiction has always translated well in comics and there has been an upswing the last few years with some great stuff to read.   The first two comics from Hard Case are TRIGGERMAN and PEEPLAND.         PEEPLAND is written by two of my favorites, Christa Faust and Gary Phillips, both authors with true bonafides when it comes to this genre. The tale is set in...

PEEPLAND #1 Reviewed

PEEPLAND Written by Gary Phillips, Christa Faust Art by Andrea Camerini Hard Case Crime October 2016             In the late 70’s, early 80’s Time Square was New York’s seedy underbelly laid bare; a bright, neon-lit sexual mecca that burned bright until developers blew in. As Disney-fied as Time Square is today, the fascination with that period –before the AIDS crisis erupted, before rampant capitalism transformed “the sleaziest block in America” into a tourist magnet–there continues to be a reemerging interest in exploring the past as more of the landmarks that gave New York its distinct grit continue to be lost to...

Fortune’s Unknown Soldier: The Influence of Hugo Pratt’s CORTO MALTESE Oct14

Fortune’s Unknown Soldier: The Influence of ...

I first heard the name “Corto Maltese” when watching the original Tim Burton Batman movie as a boy. It was mentioned in passing by reporter Vicki Vale, who’d shot an article for TIME magazine about the small, fictional war torn nation. It wouldn’t be for another 16 years that I’d learn what that particular Easter egg meant, or how much of an impact it would have on my life. The character of Corto Maltese was born out of the imagination of an Italian comic book artist/writer named Hugo Pratt, and into the pages of a magazine called Sgt Kirk in the year 1967, when the Gentleman of Fortune floated into the story...