BEHIND THE BOOK by Gary McPherson

Starting my writing career later in my life, I could easily point to a plethora of influences throughout my past that ultimately helped mold me into the writer I am today. However, I can point to five musical influences that motivated me to write JOSHUA AND THE SHADOW OF DEATH as well as the Berserker Series. The song “Monster,” by Skillet on the “Awake” album, has always been a favorite of mine. The song is such a metaphor for many internal and external struggles. It represents internal conflict and our desire to overcome the worst of our desires that lay hidden inside. As I came up with the Berserker Series, and as I worked to view Harold...

BEHIND THE BOOK: David Corbett

Something More Than a MacGuffin Transforming Doc Holliday’s love letters into a Hitchcockian trope helped fulfill a lifelong ambition to bring those letters to life Long before I had any idea a concept like “antihero” existed, I found everything about Doc Holliday fascinating. Whether I encountered him in film, TV, or the books I devoured about the disappearing frontier, it was obvious he possessed a unique place in the national imagination. He not only epitomized the American West’s “Good bad man,” that iconic frontier Frankenstein constructed of part bitter war veteran, part desperado—a haunted loner clinging to the last scraps of his...

BEHIND THE BOOK: NICK KOLAKOWSKI

  In my new novel, BOISE LONGPIG HUNTING CLUB, one of my protagonists is an arms dealer; the other is a bounty hunter. The narrative features a lot of guns, to say the least. When researching a new novel, I like as much firsthand experience as possible with whatever my main characters do. In the case of this work, however, the featured weapons far exceeded what you’d find on a typical range—one character uses a rocket launcher, for example. For my descriptions of this kind of heavy-duty firepower, I relied on friends with the right background, all of whom were only too happy to point out where I was being unnecessarily cinematic in my...

BEHIND THE BOOK – Fiction in the 1930’...

There are several different ways an author can approach writing a story set in another time period. They can do a lot of research on the time in order to get the historical details accurate. That’s an important part of the process because the same type of reader attracted to historical fiction will most likely know quite a bit about the era in which your story is set and won’t be shy about pointing out inaccuracies in their reviews.  But data on details and events can only get a writer so far. After all, you’re writing a novel, not a history book. It’s up to the writer to do more than just the details right. Tone is equally important, as is...

BEHIND THE BOOK :Writing That Second Novel

A Dialogue Between Annie Hogsett and Thomas Kies 1) What was the single biggest roadblock you discovered in writing your debut novel that affected the way you approached your second book? Tom: When I wrote RANDOM ROAD, I didn’t envision that it would be a series. My first book has a very neat ending. Everything is tied up at the end. Everyone, with one notable exception, lives happily ever after. In writing DARKNESS LANE, I had to quickly deconstruct all of that and recreate the flaws that made Geneva Chase interesting in the first place. Annie: I know this may sound like a flippant answer, but I’m serious: Looking for a publisher. As...

BEHIND THE BOOK

Memphis? Why Memphis? (Or New Orleans or Sopchoppy…) My eleventh Faye Longchamp archaeological mystery, UNDERCURRENTS, is hitting the streets right…about…now, and it’s set in Memphis, Tennessee. Wherever Faye goes—Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, New York, Oklahoma, Mississippi, or Tennessee—she has an adventure that she could have no other place.  There is only one place to explore the ghostly roots of Spiritualism and that place is New York. There is only one place to stand on the Mother Mound of the Choctaw and that place is Mississippi. Faye goes where the history is. However, she doesn’t travel to a new state with quite every book. For...