Flashback: Brian Azzarello’s 100 Bullets: An Appreciation Jul13

Flashback: Brian Azzarello’s 100 Bullets: An Appre...

This originally appeared in issue 8 (Sept/Oct 2005) SHOOT TO THRILL: Brian Azzarello’s 100 Bullets: An Appreciation by Duane Swierczynski Hardboiled comic fans are a rare breed; tough guys don’t usually do funnybooks. Yeah, yeah, I know—Mickey Spillane got his start in the comics, and his illustrated private eye Mike Danger eventually begat Mike Hammer. Batman calls himself a “detective,” and he’s certainly tough, but there’s all that fetishistic rubber to deal with. (Not knocking Christopher Nolan’s reimagining of the series, though—that was cool.) And while Sin City has been around since the early 1990s, I’m willing to bet you never heard...

Flashback: CALL IT MURDER IF YOU LIKE: RACE WILLIAMS AS CREATED BY CARROLL JOHN DALY Jul06

Flashback: CALL IT MURDER IF YOU LIKE: RACE WILLIA...

This originally appeared in issue 8 (Sept/Oct 2005) CALL IT MURDER IF YOU LIKE: RACE WILLIAMS AS CREATED BY CARROLL JOHN DALY By Gary Warren Niebuhr Carroll John Daly (1889-1958) is credited with being the father of the private eye novel. When the short story “The False Burton Combs” appeared in BLACK MASK MAGAZINE (December, 1922), it heralded a new type of character: a nameless professional detective independent of the police force, identified as a “gentleman adventurer.” Three Gun Terry Mack, featured in the BLACK MASK (May 15, 1923) story “Three Gun Terry” followed. The famous quote, “I ain’t a crook and I ain’t a dick,”...

Flashback: An Interview with David Bowker Jun29

Flashback: An Interview with David Bowker

Originally published in issue 7 (Jul/Aug 2005)   The Lord of Misrule’s Favorite Son An Interview with David Bowker By Jennifer Jordan Do a Google search for David Bowker and you’ll turn up the books and little else. Except for reviews (“Bowker’s writing is poignant, moving and funny, bristling with a new breed”; “A perfectly paced rollercoaster ride. If you care about world peace, don’t read this book”), you’ll see confusion and consternation. “I love his books but he has no web presence.” “Just who is David Bowker?” After reading every book of his I could get my greedy hands on and becoming mightily addicted to his literate,...

Flashback: Why I Love New York Jun01

Flashback: Why I Love New York

Why I Love New York By Rhys Bowen First published in issue 6 Until I started writing a mystery series set in New York in the year 1901, I never really noticed the city around me. I visited, took taxis, ate, had meetings, saw shows, shopped and left again. Now that New York is the place I write about, my senses are fine-tuned. In an apparently modern city of skyscrapers and speed, so much of that turn-of-the-century New York still exists. It is exciting to walk along Canal Street into the Lower East Side, and see streets still cobbled with the old granite blocks, tenements that would have housed immigrant families, corners on which gangs...

Flashback: Hate the Character, Love the Book May25

Flashback: Hate the Character, Love the Book

From issue 6 Hate the Character, Love the Book by Dave Zeltserman Most crime books we read center around someone who solves a crime. Private detective, police officer, bounty hunter, high stakes poker player, whatever, there’s a main character for us readers to latch onto. Someone for us to root for, to identify with. A lot of times these characters aren’t angels. Sometimes they carry quite a bit baggage; you’ll find protagonists who are ex-convicts, alcoholics – both on and off the wagon, and an assortment of other messiness from their pasts. And sometimes these characters display what in the real world would be considered strongly...

Flashback: TOURNAMENT POKER CHEATING – THE REAL DEAL May11

Flashback: TOURNAMENT POKER CHEATING – THE R...

From issue 5 TOURNAMENT POKER CHEATING THE REAL DEAL Poker is an amazing game. It requires aggression, bluffing, money management, the ability to read tells, and knowing how to play hundreds of different hands. It also requires some luck, and lots of hard work. No wonder it’s the most popular game in the country. Anyone can play, and practically everyone does. But poker also has a dirty little secret. It’s called cheating. Cheating happens in friendly games, casino card rooms, and in professional tournaments. My friends in gaming enforcement tell me it is the largest unchecked crime in America. In Mr. Lucky, there is a character named Tex...