Meg Gardiner The UNSUB Interview

  Unsub by Meg Gardiner is the first in a new series with detective Caitlin Hendrix. She is asked to join the homicide unit because of who she knows. Twenty years ago the Prophet terrorized the city and haunted the detective trying to capture him who also happens to be Caitlin’s father. Wanting to pick Mack Hendrix’s brain those working the case feel his daughter would be the best person for the job. Unfortunately, this “unsub” has returned with a vengeance. As with her father, he is playing with Caitlin’s mind, teasing and taunting her. Mack still has regrets about the one who got away and she is motivated to find the Prophet and...

Philip Kerr Interview

Crime writing is predicated upon Something Happening. Theft, murder- acts that violate our mutually agreed upon social contract. Philosophically, the definition of ‘crime’ is fluid. My learned friend at the Pritzker Museum and Library of Military History, Martin Billheimer, astutely wrote that “What we call crime is the right of power to private means.” When presented with the question, is this crime?’ The next questions must be: On whose authority? Who decides how and when to enforce laws? And then, what if, the lawmakers are also the law-breakers? When it comes to writing about the crimes of bonafide war criminals,...

Susan M. Boyer / LOWCOUNTRY BONFIRE Interview

A North Carolina native and lifelong Southerner, Susan M. Boyer has got that hospitality thing down—and it’s won her a legion of readers who treat each book as a coming home of sorts. Boyer’s charmingly cozy Liz Talbot mysteries are steeped in the deep-rooted traditions of her heritage, and have earned her USA Today bestseller status by virtue of their popularity. The first, LOWCOUNTRY BONFIRE, won the 2012 Agatha Award for Best First Novel and the Daphne du Maurier Award for Excellence in Mystery/Suspense and was also nominated for the Macavity; her third, LOWCOUNTRY BONYARD, was a Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance (SIBA) Okra...

Beatriz Williams talks about COCOA BEACH

  COCOA BEACH by Beatriz Williams is a historical novel that blends a riveting mystery with a bit of romance. The story goes back and forth within a five-year period, from 1917 to 1922. The meat of the suspense has Virginia trying to find out if her husband was really killed in a fire or did he just disappear. Now during the early days of prohibition she travels with their daughter to Florida to settle his affairs and find out the truth, including the possibility that he was a rum smuggler. Unwilling to listen to the warnings of a prohibition agent she begins to unravel the evidence. Elise Cooper: How did you get the idea for the...

Interview with Chevy Stevens

Elise Cooper: Chevy Stevens is not your real name? Chevy Stevens: Yes. I did not want to use my real name when I wrote my first book because I was self-conscious. Chevy came from a nickname used by my father and Steven is the name of my brother. My real name is Rene Unischewski, a complicated name to say the least. It is something I had to spell out my entire life so I chose an easier name. EC: How did you get the idea for the story? CS: As I was writing another story I second-guessed myself, because I was not connecting with the characters. Instinctively I felt it was not the right book, the premise was not strong enough. I decided to...

Interview with Haylen Beck / Stuart Neville

Jon: Stuart, this book is really different than anything I’ve read by you. Is that why you are publishing under a pseudonym? Stuart: Yes, but it’s also to do with the American setting. It’s one of the peculiarities of crime fiction that authors tend to become associated with a locale. Ian Rankin is inseparable from Edinburgh, for example. I’ve become associated with Belfast, for better or worse, and only RATLINES varies from that – and even then, Dublin’s only eighty miles away. So to set a book in Arizona was quite a departure in itself. And yes, the style is quite different. It’s a thriller, but it’s more high concept and overtly...