INTERVIEW WITH KITTY ZELDIS

  NOT OUR KIND by Kitty Zeldis brings to life post World War II in New York City.  1947 was an enlightening year for two women and a child, brought together after a traffic accident.  Eleanor, a young Jewish teacher and a WASPy married woman, Patricia, find an unexpected connection, after Eleanor is hired to home school Patricia’s daughter Margeaux, who sees herself as a polio cripple. This story delves into class issues, differences of religion, women’s roles, love, friendship, motherhood, and coming of age. Those who enjoy the popular made for TV show THE MARVELOUS Mrs. Maisel will definitely enjoy this novel since both concentrate...

INTERVIEW WITH KRISTINA MCMORRIS

SOLD ON A MONDAY By Kristina McMorris brings to life a story anchored in reality, by an actual photograph. The saying “a picture is worth a 1000 words” It all started with a picture that became the inspiration for an article by a struggling journalist, Ellis Reed, as it expressed the desperate days of the American Great Depression in 1931. He took a picture of two boys sitting under a sign that read, “2 children for sale.” After the picture is brought to the chief’s attention by his secretary, Lillian (Lily) Palmer, Ellis is offered his chance to write worthwhile stories that begins with this one about the boys. But his chance to advance...

Davis’ THE MASTERPIECE is featured in this week’s giveaway Sep01

Davis’ THE MASTERPIECE is featured in this w...

This week,  CrimeSpree and  Friday Reads Facebook page are pleased giving away copies of THE MASTERPIECE by Fiona Davis For the nearly nine million people who live in New York City, Grand Central Terminal is a crown jewel, a masterpiece of design. But for Clara Darden and Virginia Clay, it represents something quite different. For Clara, the terminal is the stepping stone to her future, which she is certain will shine as the brightly as the constellations on the main concourse ceiling. It is 1928, and twenty-five-year-old Clara is teaching at the lauded Grand Central School of Art. A talented illustrator, she has dreams of creating cover...

INTERVIEW WITH CAZ FREAR

SWEET LITTLE LIES by Caz Frear is a police procedural that overlaps with the psychological thriller genre.  This story follows Met detective Cat Kinsella who is investigating why and how Alice’s body is found close to her father’s pub. Cat’s troubled past comes into play as it becomes obvious that Alice was murdered and it is related to another woman vanishing eighteen years earlier. She wonders if her dad had something to do with Maryanne’s disappearance? Memories flood Cat, as a child of eight on a vacation in Ireland, she had to deal with why Maryanne had gone missing and her dad’s denial of ever knowing the seventeen-year-old girl,...

SHORT FICTION: MY SIDE OF THE MATTER – HILAR...

I swear to you I never meant to hurt anybody. With all that’s gone down in the past week, I understand why you think the worst of me. Right now, I probably seem like a combination of Darth Vader and Charles Manson thanks to the Fake News Media. Please don’t believe the stuff you read, and especially don’t listen to that stupid TV reporter who called me the Pogo Stick Killer. He’s a jackass who was mad that I wouldn’t give him an interview, that’s why he slapped that stupid name on me. Then everyone on the Internet looked up from their cat videos for a minute and thought it was funny. I don’t even own a pogo stick. And I am not a killer. To...

INTERVIEW WITH MARK DE CASTRIQUE

Mike Barson: The premise of the Buryin’ Barry series, of which this book is the seventh entry, connects to an early event in your own life. Please discuss. Mark de Castrique: My Buryin’ Barry series grew out of personal history.  My father had been a funeral director in the small mountain town of Hendersonville, NC.  For the first few years of my life, we lived upstairs.  My earliest memory is as a three-year old when I crashed a visitation one evening.  I was physically removed from behind the casket where I was singing, “So Long It’s Been Good To Know You.”  We moved shortly thereafter and my father pursued...

INTERVIEW WITH DOUG BURGESS

MIKE BARSON: FOGLAND POINT is your first novel. How long did it take you from the point where you decided to write it to when you finished and submitted it to the publisher? DOUG BURGESS: In college I wrote a short story called “Miss Emma’s Young Man” that told of an elderly New England spinster who wrote letters to herself, pretending they were from a lost love. It won an award from the university and made me think I might try my hand at fiction one day. That story became the basis for another, “Laughing Sarahs,” which appeared in Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine in 2011. Now the tale included Grandma Maggie, her friends, and Emma’s murder....

BOOK REVIEW THE HAZARDS of GOOD FORTUNE

The Hazards of Good Fortune Seth Greenland Europa Editions August 21st, 2018 The Hazards of Good Fortune by Seth Greenland explores why society is less forgiving today than in the past and relies too much on the court of public opinion. He delves into the issues of race, religion, and how they are intertwined. Greenland wanted to write a story centered around “a New York real estate mogul that takes some events of Donald Sterling’s life.  I thought Sterling got everything he deserved, but it did make me think.  I actually had a character before I had a story, knowing that I wanted to write about someone tried and convicted before he had his...