Interview with Haylen Beck / Stuart Neville

Jon: Stuart, this book is really different than anything I’ve read by you. Is that why you are publishing under a pseudonym? Stuart: Yes, but it’s also to do with the American setting. It’s one of the peculiarities of crime fiction that authors tend to become associated with a locale. Ian Rankin is inseparable from Edinburgh, for example. I’ve become associated with Belfast, for better or worse, and only RATLINES varies from that – and even then, Dublin’s only eighty miles away. So to set a book in Arizona was quite a departure in itself. And yes, the style is quite different. It’s a thriller, but it’s more high concept and overtly...

Karen Dionne talks about THE MARSH KING’S DA...

THE MARSH KING’S DAUGHTER Karen Dionne G.P. Putnam’s Sons Pub June 13th, 2017 THE MARSH KING’S DAUGHTER by Karen Dionne delves into what life is like for a child of a long-term kidnap victim. Anyone that has wondered about Amanda Berry or Jaycee Dugard should read this story. These women were kidnapped, raped, and bore a child while being interned in a prison of hell. But what happens to the child conceived under these conditions? This is the ultimate love/hate story between a child, Helena, and her parents. By beginning each chapter with a section of the fairy tale, THE MARSH KING’S DAUGHTER by Hans Christian Anderson,...

Joseph Kanon talks about DEFECTORS

Elise Cooper: How did you get the idea for the story? Joseph Kanon: The origin came out of something personal. Years ago I worked with a man who actually had a brother that defected. It was a fascinating story to me, and I realized no one talked about the family left behind. Once he had defected, that was the last heard of him. I thought about the after story, since he did not just vanish. I wondered what kind of life did he have, and what did he do all day. EC: How did you do the research? JK: I read about Kim Philby, a high-ranking member of British intelligence who was a Soviet agent. He defected in 1963 after working for the KGB. I had...

Paullina Simons talks about reissue of RED LEAVES

Red Leaves by Paullina Simons was first published in the 1990s. Re-published this April it is as relevant today as it was back then. The first half of the book explores the relationship between four Dartmouth college students whose friendship seems to be unraveling. In the second half the mystery unfolds. The nude body of the star basketball player is found frozen in the snow in the campus woods. Called in to investigate Detective Spencer Patrick O’Malley realizes this is the same girl he met and had asked out on a date. Recognizing the three friends are people of interest he must find the truth behind all the secrets in order to find the...

Jeffery Deaver talks about THE BURIAL HOUR

THE BURIAL HOUR by Jeffery Deaver incorporates his usual writing style with misdirection and plot twists. The subject matter is timely and relevant, taking into account the many concerns of the Western world. Although the plot begins in New York the main setting is in Italy, where the classics play an important role, intertwining Greek G-ds with legendary musical compositions of “The Blue Danube,” “The Nutcracker,” and “Danse Macabre.” The plot begins with the abduction of a business executive in Manhattan by someone known as “The Composer.” Left behind at the scene is a small hangman’s noose. Lincoln Rhymes, the notable Forensics...